Trouble Sleeping?

Sleep FAQ’s: Sleep Problems

There are many different reasons a person might have trouble sleeping. Your mattress however, does not have to be one of them. Below we have collected a number of sleep related questions or concerns about different areas of sleep difficulty. We hope this will help lead you to a better, more refreshing sleep.

  • What can shift workers or people who work at night do to sleep better?
    • Anyone who sleeps during the day needs to make sure their room is dark – use heavy window coverings to block out the light. This is important for everyone, but particularly for people who sleep when it's bright outside. Also, make sure your room is cool, between 60 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit (16 to 18 degrees Celsius). Sleep on a comfortable, supportive mattress and foundation that offers you enough space to move around comfortably. And sleep in a room that's quiet. The sleep environment is a very controllable part of good sleep – whether you're sleeping during the day or at night. You can adjust the temperature, replace an uncomfortable or worn-out mattress, block out noise with earplugs or a white noise machine and keep light from your bedroom with dark blinds or eye shades.
  • Is there a problem with falling asleep on the sofa watching television, not falling asleep in bed?
    • If you regularly fall asleep on your sofa, you may not be getting as much sleep as you need at night in your bed. Or maybe your sofa is more comfortable than your bed! In either case, you should make sure to practice good sleep habits – from sleeping on a comfortable, supportive mattress to not drinking alcohol too close to bedtime. And try to get more sleep – it may change how you feel during the day. Check out the Better Sleep Guide for tips on how to get a better night's sleep.
  • Where should I go for information if I think I have a sleep-related health problem?
    • If you've tried the common sense tips from our Better Sleep Guide, and you know you're sleeping in a restful bedroom environment including a comfortable and supportive mattress, you should see your doctor. You may have a medical condition that interferes with getting a good night's sleep. Check out our Sleep Disorders link for groups that might be able to help.
  • What if there's no time for sleep? What can people do to sleep better?
    • Q. What if there's no time for sleep? What can people do to sleep better? A. Sleep needs to be a health priority. It affects every aspect of your day-to-day living. If you can't say "yes" to sleep, make sure to make the most out of the sleep you get. Exercise regularly – people who exercise a few times a week sleep better than people who don't. Also, avoid caffeine, alcohol and tobacco products late in the day. All can interfere with sleep. You need to create a restful sleep environment so the sleep you get is restorative and uninterrupted. Sleep in a dark room, on a comfortable, supportive mattress. Keep the room cool and quiet. And if you find yourself too stressed to sleep, make a list of all the things you need to do. Once you've made your to-do list, give yourself permission to relax and sleep. You'll need the energy to tackle your tasks in the morning.
  • Can people make up for lost sleep during the week by sleeping in on weekends?
    • No. If you sleep more on the weekends than during the week – and many of us do – this indicates that you have a "sleep debt." A sleep debt accumulates when you don't get enough sleep. The only way to reduce the debt is to sleep as much as your body needs every night. Make sure you're getting the right quality of sleep as well. Sleep in a cool, dark, quiet room on a comfortable, supportive mattress to get your best night's sleep.
  • How can someone tell if they have a sleep disorder?
    • If you've looked at your sleep environment and your everyday routine to make sure you're not sabotaging your sleep and you still feel sleepy after getting a full night's sleep, you should see your doctor. You may have a medical condition that interferes with getting a good night's sleep. Check out our Sleep Disorders link for groups with more information.

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